Feature Update: Enhanced questionnaire structure view

This week we started rolling out the newest version of our Voxco Online SaaS platform to include a highly requested feature. In the past, after questionnaires were written and programmed, the default preview display made it difficult to present the questionnaire structure to others and request their feedback. Well no more!

We have reviewed and updated the entire questionnaire structure preview to make it more helpful when presenting questionnaires to others.

These changes will make the questionnaire structure preview easier to understand on-screen, including the ability to add survey settings and block settings directly via the display. We’ve also added an option to export the questionnaire structure display into Microsoft Word as an HTML file. The Word file can then be formatted, edited, and presented to others:


Now Voxco Online users can easily share questionnaire structure with non-users, who can see all questionnaire language and survey logic in one place. This is especially helpful for market researchers who regularly present questionnaire content and flow to their clients for their feedback and approval.

If this is something that could benefit your market research team, give it a try! You can access the new questionnaire structure preview directly from the survey editor with the slider under the side navigation (choose ‘Structure’):


You can then export the previews to an HTML file by choosing ‘Print All’ or ‘Print Selected’ in the side navigation, and then choosing the new ‘Save as HTML for Word’:


Stay in touch! We’re regularly updating the software with new features, many of which are requested by clients.

August Software Feature Updates

August Voxco Survey Software Feature Updates

Another month, another round of survey features being added to the Voxco platform. We’re excited to update you on what’s new now that the software was updated overnight. Here we go!

SFTP Support

When uploading survey results to an external site, or downloading raw data files for importation into the Voxco survey platform, we now offer full SFTP support in addition to the pre-existing FTP service.

SFTP is an even more secure method of transferring data that uses a private and safe data stream. Its major benefit is that it encrypts the connection between your computer and the FTP server, never sending file data or passwords as clear text.

SaaS Support for Twilio

Twilio allows its users to programmatically make phone calls and send text messages using its web service APIs. Now, Voxco clients who regularly use Twilio’s short codes when auto-sending SMS text messages can now be fully compliant with provider requirements by enabling an automated response for keywords like ‘help’, ‘stop’, or ‘unsubscribe’.

Survey Widgets Compatibility

Ok, this one isn’t new, but we’d like to highlight it anyways. Survey Widgets offers the ability to add even more innovative features to your online surveys (e.g. enhanced sliders, rotating image galleries, or dynamic image rankings). Fun surveys enhance the respondent experience and drive completion rates & response quality. Their entire library of widgets are fully compatible with Voxco Online and Voxco Mobile Offline.

Lookup Table Filter Conditions: New Operators

You can now more easily return values which are or are not in a list of comma-delimited values by using the new In/Not In operator.

AllRows Piping Command

You can combine the above operator with the new AllRows piping command to generate a CSV list of all answers across a loop.

The command can also be used to return a list of all answers for all mentions of a specific question across all rows of a loop.

For example:

Q1 Checkbox question with choices 1,2,3

  • Q1 loop 1 = 1
  • Q1 loop 2 = 1,2
  • Q1 loop 3 = 3

[Q1.AllRows] will return 1,1,2,3

Update Details

Have any questions about the above functions or compatibilities? Contact your local support center or your Voxco rep. We’re happy to help you get the most out of your Voxco survey software!

July Software Feature Updates

July Voxco Survey Software Feature Updates Windows 10 Blog Header

Voxco regularly integrates brand new features to our online survey software. Sometimes these are based on client requests, sometimes they’re just add-ons that our hard-working development team thinks would be an awesome addition to what is already the industry’s most flexible survey platform.

We’re going to get in the habit of sharing these new features with you via the blog each month as they are released. The features below were updated onto our SaaS platform yesterday, July 20.

Keep an eye out for future updates. For now, here’s what’s new this July!

Windows 10 Support

We now support Windows 10 for all browser-based elements of our platform, including Design, Pronto dashboard, and Supervisor bar for 1.10.5. So you can finally accept those pesky Microsoft update notifications! 😉

Scheduled sample imports & updates

It’s now possible to schedule one-time or recurring sample imports from an external data source.

Users of Voxco Panel Manager can now also schedule one-time or recurring sample updates to automatically update your survey with new panelists.

Task notifications

You can now select that the platform sends automated email notifications to project stakeholders once a task is completed or if it fails. This is helpful for keeping track of the successful execution of distributions and other key project tasks.

Panelist field configuration

You can now specify which panelist fields are required for a panel. This enforces validation every time you import panelists, update panelists, edit an individual panelist or add a new panelist. One more way to ensure that your panel is on-target, every time.

Link panelists to surveys via Survey Sample Import

We’ve added a handful of new automated options for linking panelists and surveys via the existing Survey Sample Import feature. You can now link samples to panels via Panelist ID, Email, Username, Phone, and more.

Copy distributions

Project managers who execute numerous similar survey projects can now further streamline their distribution set-up by copying distribution settings from a past survey. Some small feature changes can make a big difference to project productivity.

New respondent filter options

We’ve added several new options for the the survey respondent filter. You can now identify respondents based on the number of days since the following activities occurred:

  • A respondent started a survey
  • A respondent terminated a survey
  • An email or SMS invitation was sent
  • An email or SMS invitation has NOT been sent
  • An email or SMS invitation was received by a respondent
New survey data cleaning options

You can now choose to clean the answers of calling questions on pre-load. When this option is selected, a pre-load cleaning Branch To action will clean the answer of the calling question.

SMS Invitations

Reminder that since our Voxco Online 5.5.1 update, we have offered the ability to send SMS survey invitations.

As a communication channel, SMS text messages are growing in popularity and offer new reach to the channels with which you can invite respondents and panelists to complete surveys.

If you’d like an overview of how Voxco SMS invitations work, please reach out to your Voxco rep.

Translating custom questions

Can be done via the Translation module, just like other question types.

New features available now!

If you’re using the Voxco platform via the cloud, these new features are available now. If your platform is hosted on-site (yes, this is something we offer!), contact our support team to schedule an update.

To see the full details on each of the above updates, please view the individual sections in our online help section.

Onwards and upwards – see you next month!

Events Season Recap


May and June are always a flurry of industry events. And Voxco attends as many of them as possible – the level of insight that can be gained and connections that can be made via networking at these events is unmatched. Roll the highlights reel!

In May, Vincent and Jeb attended AAPOR in Austin. There is literally no better event for hearing North American pollster thought leaders share what’s trending in the world of public opinion and survey research. It’s awesome to have detailed conversation about survey strategy with people who love the topic as much as we do – shout out to a few clients we spent time with there: NORC, Precision Opinion, Siena College, Recon MR and Roanoke College.

At the end of May, Voxco had a different kind of event experience. C2 Montréal is one of the largest and most influential business conferences in North America, and it happens right here in our home town. We reached out to C2 this year and offered our platform and our professional scripting services to help them get a better attendee feedback system than they had been getting from the lower-end DIY platform they used in years past. For the first time, they combined post-event online surveys with in-the-moment mobile interviews, which gave them a much more robust level of feedback. Keep an eye out for a more detailed client success story, coming soon.

Speaking of Voxco having the home field advantage, MRIA was also held in Montreal this year. Two and a half jam-packed days of Canadian-focused #MRX insight from some of the premier industry thought leaders. Our booth was a center of attention both for our own clients and new friends we met for the first time. The Canadian crowds always put a smile on our faces, and it was awesome to welcome them to our own city!

New this year was our first appearance at ICES-V just last week. The once-every-four-years International Conference on Establishment Surveys brought us into contact with a number of leading statisticians from across Europe and the world. Our CEO, Raymond, is especially numbers-savvy, so he was gleefully absorbed with talking shop with many of the world’s leading national statisticians. The advanced professional capability of our platform really drew in the crowds to the Voxco booth and software demonstration, and we can’t wait to tailor a the right platform for many of them.

So now the summer is here. And with it comes a short lull in industry events. As we put our nose to the grindstone and plan our run up to Fall and our first few conferences (ESOMAR and others) it’s nice to have a short moment of focus on what matters: making killer multichannel survey tools. But gosh do we love the chance to share our survey nerdery with like-minded industry colleagues! 😉

Online surveys are not enough


Part 2: Get surveys noticed in the offline world

You don’t have to read Part 1 of this blog series to be aware of the worrying issue facing market researchers: online surveys are being ignored in growing numbers thanks to survey fatigue in respondents. While online remains an essential part of any survey program, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to ensure that they are getting noticed – they’re just too easy for respondents to ignore.

So how can your survey stand out? By changing channels completely, and using the personal touch of an interviewer. There’s something to be said about the old-school survey method: it’s harder to say no to a real person’s interview request than it is to ignore one of hundreds of web links seen online each day. There is a reason face-to-face interviewing is often referred to as ‘intercept.’ You are literally intercepting a respondent in the middle of their day and getting noticed.

Adapt. Existing survey methods are in decline, and only the flexible will survive. Managing effective survey programs in 2016 requires you to complement online surveys with offline channels that can help create a more representative tapestry of insights. Here are some of the major advantages of complementing online surveys with other, interviewer-lead channels:

In-the-moment feedback

Most online survey invitations are sent after an event or experience. Imagine a customer satisfaction survey, automatically sent via email after a purchase: the respondent opens the email a few hours or days later and completes the survey, remembering back on their experience. But when a respondent is asked about an experience while they are still experiencing it, their answers are typically more emotional, and more direct.

Thoughtfulness of responses

When an interviewer is asking questions personally, they are better able to nurture the conversation and ensure that the respondents fully understand questions and carefully consider responses. Interviewers can ask follow-ups and add prompts to help elicit more robust answers. There is no way of knowing if respondents online are taking the time to consider their answers.

Respondent access

To survey respondents online, researchers either need their email, or they need to get their survey link into a respondent’s hands somehow (like via the bottom of a receipt). But how can researchers survey truly random respondents who haven’t yet engaged with a brand in some way? Imagine 10,000 people passing through a train station in the morning, or average people in a given city on a given day – how can a researcher get their survey in front of them without ever having interacted with them before? When your surveys are offline, respondents are suddenly everywhere.

The personal touch

In a world of online gadgets, a little offline communication can warm the soul. Offline studies see friendly interviewers approach respondents with tablets and smiles, looking for a genuine conversation. Will many people still turn down the request? Of course! But unlike approaching respondents by sending another email and another web link to click, is it so crazy to think that offline surveys could actually be a positive interruption for some people?

Believe the hype – the rapid evolution of survey technology offers incredible online survey opportunities. But today’s online-overdosed reality may actually require researchers to complement their online surveys with a step away from the web and back into the real world. It’s a fairly fundamental business concept: what’s different gets noticed. So think different.

Want to explore how easy it can be to create engaging offline surveys for real-world interviewing? Get in touch with Voxco today!



5 Reasons to support the 2016 Canadian Census

Why Marketers Should Support the 2016 Canadian Census

When Justin Trudeau’s newly formed majority government announced the reinstatement of the mandatory long-form census in its very first Liberal caucus meeting, researchers and businesses across Canada celebrated. The mandatory long-form census was a huge step back in the right direction for lovers of data across the nation that Voxco calls home.

Here’s a great article by Jan Kestle, Chair of CMA’s Customer Insights & Analytics Council, first published on the Canadian Marketing Association website here:

Starting at the beginning of May, Canadians are being asked to complete the 2016 Census. And there is good news for businesses, consumers and citizens alike.

As you’ll recall for the 2011 Census, the mandatory long-form census was replaced by a voluntary survey. This move resulted in a non-response bias that meant a lot of small-area data for 2011 could not be released—including data on income, education, labour force activity and special populations like immigrants and aboriginal peoples. The loss of the long-form census was a significant blow to policy makers, researchers, data scientists and marketing professionals.

But today we can breathe a sigh of relief because the mandatory long-form census is back, and the complexity of the Canadian population will once again be documented in a comprehensive and statistically sound way. Support for the restoration of a “proper” census came from all corners of Canadian society and has reinforced the fact that the Census of Canada is a national treasure to be protected and supported.

In this era of Big Data, some people wonder why we need the census. There are many reasons, but here are my top five for marketers:

  1. Key metrics like market share and untapped potential use census-based data to benchmark an organization’s users against total population.
  2. Census-derived demographics are used to weight surveys to make them applicable to the general population—and more actionable.
  3. Segments derived from small-area census data are used by marketers to link disparate data sources together—connecting demographics to lifestyle and media preferences and thereby helping marketers get the right message to the right people using their preferred media.
  4. Census data for neighbourhoods can help harness unstructured data from digital and social media. This allows marketers to link internal offline data to online sources-–getting closer to a single view of the customer.
  5. Using census-derived data to leverage existing surveys and administrative databases results in businesses asking consumers fewer questions. Businesses don’t have to collect data if it already exists in another form—and consumers benefit.

Because of these and many other reasons, we urge Canadians to fill out the Census—whether they get the short or long form. The Census is essential to the fundamental operation of the country—from planning the provision of social services to managing economic growth.

We live in a time when busy consumers expect brands to know and connect with them. The resulting good data will also help us be better marketers.

Read the source article at CMA

Online surveys are not enough


Part 1: The oversaturation of online surveys.

Online will remain the #1 survey channel for the time-being, and deservedly so. The channel offers the ability for respondents to privately complete surveys on their own time. For researchers, data can be processed immediately, and there are no additional costs for interviewers.

But because of the simplicity and efficiency of online surveys, the market is quickly becoming oversaturated and respondents are getting overwhelmed. Online survey invitations are everywhere, and the surveys they link to are often sloppy. And the resulting online survey clutter leads to survey fatigue, which leads to a range of data collection issues, none of which are good news for researchers:

  • Declining response rates. Many online surveys see single-digit response rates as low as 2%. And respondents who do complete the surveys generally have an extreme opinion: they’re either ecstatic or livid. It’s difficult to get a balanced opinion when you’re only talking to outliers.
  • Reduced respondent attention span. For respondents who still complete surveys, the increased frequency can affect their in-survey attention span. The more survey questions they see, the higher their tendency to burn through questions too quickly without adequate thought.
  • Market saturation. With so many surveys vying for a respondent’s attention, how can one organization get their survey noticed and completed?

So are online surveys doomed? Of course not – but researchers tasked with deploying them are certainly being challenged. We’ve discussed numerous times in the past how to make online surveys more engaging. Here is the TL;DR version:

  • Design surveys well. A no-brainer, but so important. Keep online surveys short and sweet on the surface. Nowadays, if your survey looks cheap or takes longer than five minutes, you’ll start losing a portion of the respondents who were willing to click on the link in the first place.
  • Listen and Adapt. Surveys are a two-way conversation. Ensure that the respondent knows you’re listening to their answers. Use logic to skip irrelevant questions or pipe in past responses. If a respondent feels like they are being heard, they’re more likely to share.
  • Incentivize. Incentives increase response rates which offsets your sample cost. Unincentivized survey requests are a primary target in the rising pushback against online survey invitations.
  • Personalize the invitation. Ensure that survey invitations speak to the right people, and acknowledge the respondent situation. Use a clean sample source and personalize the message to clarify why they were chosen (eg. “Thanks for your purchase of X last Tuesday…”).
  • Create a community. Cut to the heart of your customer base and nurture your own panels of your loyal consumers. It’s a lot of work to create and manage, but an incentivized, permanent panel will give you a constant finger on the pulse of your most important customer segment.

Online surveys are an essential part of any Voice of Customer or research program. But in today’s industry reality, you need to accept that getting a respondent’s attention online is extremely challenging. Get your surveys noticed by complementing well-designed online surveys with surveys conducted via alternate channels.

Break through the heads-down, clutter-ignoring patterns of an average respondent’s daily routine. Think differently about how to get your survey noticed by respondents. Taking your survey project out of your own comfort zone can take you into a new zone where respondents actually notice your surveys.

We’ll expand more on this idea through this three-part blogpost series. Read Part 2 (Get surveys noticed in the offline world) now and Part 3 (The multi-channel advantage) will land in the coming weeks!

C2 Montreal will use Voxco MultiMode to measure 2016 event success


This year one of the world’s premiere business events celebrates its fifth year, and we’re super-excited to play a pretty important role. C2 Montreal combines Commerce and Creativity by bringing together over 5000 international creative minds to explore trends, opportunities and disruptions on the horizon.

The event includes big name talks, innovative brainstorming workshops, and a massive outdoor village with daily entertainment. It has been called “a conference unlike any other” by the Harvard Business Review.


For a modern event that celebrates what’s trending in creativity and commerce, it’s essential that the organizers keep a finger on the attendee pulse during the show. They then also need to use post-event attendee feedback to ensure that their show is constantly evolving and will keep attendees coming back year after year. And that’s where Voxco is lending a hand.

We’ve joined forces with C2 to help them with their multifaceted attendee feedback needs. We’re thrilled that they have adopted Voxco MultiMode and will be putting it to the task for this year’s event. Their program will include:

  • On-location mobile surveys: To measure the pulse of the event while attendees are in the moment, volunteers with tablets will conduct surveys both inside the event and outside at the village. These mobile surveys will offer event organizers a live snapshot of attendee satisfaction levels and a notification system will alert organizers of time-sensitive feedback so that they can instantly take action on the results.
  • Post-event online surveys: Using Voxco Online, event organizers will invite attendees shortly after the event closes to answer a self-completion survey. It will measure their satisfaction and recall of numerous event activities, and identify how many business connections they made. All the feedback will then be analyzed and will help fine-tune the show in upcoming years.
  • Professional Services: The Voxco Professional Services team will handle all survey programming and design work for the project, to allow the organizers more time for analyzing and reacting to the results.

Voxco MultiMode will be a major upgrade over the overly simple DIY solution that the C2 team used in the past. The ability to design more engaging surveys, interview attendees live on the floor, and the expert programming and design services are all a huge advantage for the event organizers.


Get in touch with the Voxco team today if your event would benefit from a more flexible attendee feedback solution!

Avoid these 10 mistakes when managing panel communities

11 mistakes to avoid when running an online MR community

Stephen Cribbett of Dub Research in London recently published a post that was picked up by Quirks. The article perfectly highlights the downfalls that many researchers face when planning and launching a new panel community.

The article was written from the POV of focus groups and qualitative communities, but the concepts are still heavily influential for launching and nurturing survey panel communities. We’ve shortened and a little and highlighted the most important tips below.

In short, remember that panelists are busy people. Busy people who have a genuine interest in participating in your research. So be sure to cater to them – acknowledge them, make them feel welcome, and ensure that they feel comfortable enough that they will stick around and share their experiences with you. On with the list:

1. Creating a virtual ghost town

When your research community launches and the first person to arrive finds a community devoid of people, conversations and any life forms, they’ll be experiencing what’s referred to as a virtual ghost town. And nobody wants to be the first person at a party.

Establish some energy by seeding content from the very beginning, and sometimes even before the community has launched to participants.

2. Failing to welcome and brief participants

Eager to begin the research activities, researchers can sometimes forget the critical importance of establishing rapport and warming up participants. Encourage them to open up and express themselves, making certain that they understand that there is no right or wrong answer.

To facilitate this, consider using ice-breaking activities such as an open discussion or mini ‘fun’ surveys. When new participants come into the research community and see these existing activities, it gives them a head start in getting to know the other respondents (if structured as open discussion), or understanding the structure of the panel and future surveys (if structured as introductory surveys). Here are some example questions:

  • What do you always carry with you in your bag?
  • Who do you most admire in life and why?
  • What can’t you live without?
  • When did you last do something for the first time?

Note that some of these ‘fun’ questions can double as panelist profile attributes for future filtering!

3. Not sharing the purpose and objectives

Both the community and the individual tasks and discussions that you are launching need clear explanation. The more you can clarify the objective of asking a question or setting a task, the more likely you are to get a great response.

Trust leads to greater openness and expression from the members, which means you are more likely to uncover unexpected insights in your research. Transparency with regards to the community mission will be vital in order for you to accomplish this endeavor.

4. Not being flexible with time and structure

Structure is important but rigid adherence to pre-determined tasks can be your enemy. You want to leave enough in your agenda to allow members to touch on further topics, since this can lead to interesting ideas and themes bubbling up to the surface via qualitative discussion. Remember to build in time to explore these unanticipated topic areas.

5. Peaking too soon

The energy and excitement around the initial launch of a community can sometimes result in it peaking too early, with moderators losing focus or getting distracted with other work commitments as time passes. Be on guard against this, even for relatively short communities. Working to establish solid relationships within the community early on can help keep things going strong and lead to productive discussions and valuable insights.

6. Not getting to know your chosen community platform

When it comes to selecting the best and most appropriate market research technology, spend time doing your due diligence and learning how it works. You don’t want to make the common mistake of assuming the technology can do something it can’t. Choose a panel portal tool with a robust backend management toolbox and an engaging portal experience for panelists.

Once you’ve made your choice, make time to experiment or run trials. Give yourself time fully understand its capabilities and how far you can push the tasks. Promotional note: Voxco Panel Manager offers a Day 1 integration kit that gives you the source code and design templates you need to get started immediately. Get in touch with us to see how it can help!

7. Expecting too much of your members

Avoid cramming in too many tasks and discussions because, ultimately, it will over-load members who will quickly lose interest and slope off. Always try to take a step back and ask yourself, “Would I be prepared to do this myself?” or “Would I be able to achieve this in the allotted time?”

8. Thinking, “If I build it, they will come.”

Simply building a research community is not enough. Communities are organic, living things that require time, effort, intellect and resources in order to be successful and reveal the insights that you need.

Take the community through its life stages, investing in people and relationships along the way. When obstacles come – and they will – try to see them as opportunities and be confident that you can always find a way to work around them.

9. Not being prepared for the volume of data

Many first-timers end up underestimating the amount of data they will collect, and then don’t have a good plan in place for how to analyze and report on that data. So a top tip is to formulate hypotheses, and be prepared for rolling analysis techniques and tools.

On a typical basis you should seek to commence your analyses halfway through the community. If you have resources available, consider how to combine efforts and work together as a team.

10. No plan in place

You can’t launch your community on day one and then wait until day two to figure out what to do! Be sure to know how the next few weeks or months will play out. What will your role and input be? Only then can you manage client expectations. Community planning requires a careful balance. Although you should look to avoid over-planning and preparing, It’s recommended that you have a loose framework to utilize your members time effectively.

The welcoming phase is crucial, demanding effort and energy, so having early activities set up and ready to roll will make your life so much easier, leaving you time to concentrate on planning and re-shaping further activities in the light of feedback that you gather.

Read the source article at Research Industry Voices

Survey Panel Pains – What is Really Going On?

OMG Survey Panel Pains – WTH is Really Going On?

Matt Dusig recently published a great article on his Innovate MR blog. It was a solid counterpoint to the decreasing lack of confidence that researchers are feeling with the state of online panels.

Commenters like Adrianna Rocha and Dave McCaughan have positioned online panels as no longer responsive, email click-through rates are abysmal, panelists must try 10 surveys before earning a significant reward. So is there a solution for online panel quality or are we doomed for all eternity?

Well, good news from Matt: the sad state of online survey panels is really no one’s fault!

Panel companies create databases of people interested in participating in surveys to earn a reward. For the most part, these people genuinely want to provide honest data in exchange for this reward. Survey panelists use their spare time and don’t really equate the time spent in terms of the value of their hourly rate (at work). While creating the databases, the panel sites will ask the user for basic demographic, geographic and psychographic information.

When researchers have a study that needs sample, they send a specific request for the types of people that need to be targeted. Sometimes the sampling firm can match 100% of the client request data fields to the panelist data. But more often than not, the sampling firm doesn’t have 100% data match in their database. Why? Because there are millions of possible questions that could be asked of a respondent. For example: “I want men, 35-54, living in California, have psoriasis, but don’t actively treat it with medicine.” A sampling firm may know everything except for whether or not the respondent is using medicine. Therefore, either the sampling firm asks the user to answer extra questions before being redirected to the client survey or they send the user into the client survey to be screened. The latter increases the possibility of a poor user experience as the user will most likely answer many other questions before getting to the specific termination point regarding usage of medicine.

Technical integration

(Note: Matt is talking about common problems with most survey software providers – and it truly is a big problem! But the Voxco platform freely exchanges information with panel suppliers, including demographics, quotas, and more. It pays to support a panel with a solid survey software platform.)

Whether the sample company is programming the survey or just sending panelists to a client-hosted survey, there’s almost no technical integration between sampling and most survey software. Meaning, sampling firms usually cannot send panelist’s demographic or geographic data that’s already known about a panelist, into most lower-end survey software. Also, sampling technology systems usually do not have visibility into open quotas, in real-time, via API. So, a panelist clicks into survey only to be told, “Sorry you don’t qualify” or “Sorry the survey is closed.” That notification usually occurs after the panelist has already answered many different questions, and most of these answers are already known by the panel company. But because sampling firms are only paid for each user who completes a survey, there are financial constraints on how much a rejected panelist can be paid when they don’t qualify.

The solution is multi-faceted.

We (The Research Industry) need better integration between survey software and sampling technology platforms AND we need agreement that there are best practices surrounding survey design which help panelists provide valuable data. Years ago there was an industry-wide initiative for research agencies and sampling companies to create a shared data warehouse, but I don’t think there was much interest in bearing the costs of managing the platform. I still think this would be a valuable asset for the entire industry.

Mobile mobile mobile.

Do you check your email on your mobile phone? So do panelists! Do you want to take a 20+ minute survey staring at your phone? Neither do panelists! If you write and design surveys, you have to ask yourself, “Would I enjoy taking this survey?” When the answer is “Yes,” then we’ll all be helping to build better quality databases of respondents. I think the saying is: “Help me, help you.”

Read the source article from Innovate MR

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